The Archives: Cotofly

One file in the Archives reveals information about the Cotofly. You read carefully to learn about this creature and obtain more knowledge about the mysterious species of Ark.


200 Clicks

300 Clicks

500 Clicks

Availability

Retired

Dates

Available Apr 16 - Apr 30, 2017.

Obtained From

Cave

Habitat

Fairy World

Height

1.3 m

Weight

14.75 kg

Population Rank

#89 of 625

About Cotofly Eggs

The Cotofly egg is soft to the touch, almost like a plush doll. It is adorned with pink and green floral patterns that seem to swirl and change the longer you look at it. Scientists at the Science and Research Center in Ark City have yet to determine the exact species these patterns belong to or why they appear on the egg in the first place and thus some speculate that they are otherworldly, though they do bear a strong resemblance to the carnation. A plethora of strong scents emanate from these eggs, a strange combination of myrrh, lavender, rose petals and cloves.

About the Cotofly Creature

Cotoflies are a strange, elusive creature most commonly found during spring. Once simply known as the "Fairy Bunny", they were prevalent in Ark lore dating back to ancient times. These myths varied widely, with some describing the Cotofly as a benevolent spirit that brought fertility and good harvest to the land, while others condemning them as tricksters who preyed on unsuspecting travelers and caused harvests to become overripe. For many years, they were simply believed to be just that, a myth, however a colony of Cotoflies was found living near the woods of a glade in the outskirts of Ark City. These specimens were perfectly congruent with the previous descriptions of the "Faerie Bunny," from the strange carnation-like markings to their wings.

After being heavily scrutinized by SARC scientists, it was deemed that the myths surrounding the Cotofly were largely baseless and that they weren't inherently benevolent nor malevolent and that there were very few verified reports of Cotofly individuals deceiving travelers or farmers in any way. The fact that they bring about good harvest does hold some ground, however. Cotoflies tend to gravitate towards fertile lands that are brimming with blooming flowers.

Cotoflies can tell each other apart from their highly distinctive markings. It is said that no two individuals share the same exact floral pattern.

Entry Written By: izzy
CDWC Winning Entry By: izzy